DESKTOP EDITION CLOUD EDITION SERVER EDITION GUIDES FORUM

Non-admin install in windows 7


#1

This is an issue that can wait to be fixed as I would rather have the status of quotes etc fixed first. I use Windows 7 and I log in with a standard user account that does not have admin rights. Normally when I install a program, the UAC will pop up an authentication dialog asking me to put in the password of the local admin account.

This does not happen with Manager - there is no ability to run the setup as administrator. So I have to log out and login as a local admin and install the program and the log back in to my usual login. Not a big issue, but I would imagine changing the msi to require admin rights to run should not be difficult as its a standard requirement for all setup programs to run as administrator. I should be able to right click and run setup as administrator.


#2

You can right-click on installation file and then select “Run as administrator” option.


#3

Thats what I should be able to do. But there is NO run as administrator option when I right click, hence this topic was opened. At least ways there is no run as administrator option on windows 7 - I cannot speak for other operating systems.


#4

Try holding Shift while right-clicking. You should see an opting Run as administrator or Run as different user


#5

That works. It gives me the option to run as a different user. Is it difficult to change the msi coding to automatically come up with run as administrator when somebody clicks on the setup file as very few people know to use shift while right clicking. Hell I didn’t even know that and I work in IT. Normally there is an option to run as admin showing when you right click - one does not normally have to use the shift to get it to show.


#6

Why do you want to install the program as administrator anyway?


#7

Dalacor something you could try … Create a new short cut to point to the executable file you wish to run as an administrator. Now change the properties of the new short cut to launch the executable file as other user / administrator.


#8

Probably to do with where I have told the program to install manager ie the C: drive. When I try and update, it comes up with an error saying it does have permission to update the files or something like that. I need admin rights to update c:\Manager where the program is installed.

Perhaps if I move the program to another location it would not need admin rights. By default you need admin rights to make changes to anything on the c: drive.


#9

Yes I could do that, but thats just a workaround. I might just as well logoff and logon as local admin, update the program and then log back off again. I am not worried about it, because it doesn’t take me long to update the program, I was just raising the issue, because I was unsure why the windows 7 UAC was not prompting me to run as admin when installing the program.

I will just logoff local user and log on as admin when I want to update. Its no biggie


#10

Just curious - why isn’t your home folder suitable for installation? No admin rights required there so you shouldn’t have an issue.

If it’s because you need other users on your computer to access Manager, have you tried installing into the Public folder (C:\Users\Public)? Presumably all local users can access that shared space and therefore everyone will be able to run Manager and you’ll still be able to update it easily. Not tried it myself, but can’t see why that wouldn’t work - although admittedly it puts the application at risk of being corrupted or deleted by someone if they mess about too much.


#11

I work in IT for a living. I have learnt that the best way to set your computer up is to partition your computer. I have three partitions. One for windows, one for home/personal data and the third partition is for business data.

I backup drive d: and e: (my personal and business data). If windows needs to be re-installed I wipe drive C: without having to backup any data apart from one or two config files for certain programs. I don’t have to waste time transferring data.

So my Manager is on drive E: where my business data is stored.

When I first installed Manager, I told it to install to the c:\manager directory - in theory I should really tell the program to install to c:\program files so that all the programs are in the same location. I do not like using the c:\users\profile directory for storing data for a program (for ease of re-installing windows, backups etc) and I don’t think that a program should be running from that location. That is what the program files directory was designed for.

I am not worried about having to log off and log on as I don’t update Manager every week so its not a problem. I just raised the issue to make the developer aware that the program does not prompt the UAC as it should thats all.

I like seperating my data from windows and I like my program to run from the same location. As an IT technician I have noticed over the years that re-installing windows and programs is very quick. Transferring the data (because its on the same partition and all over the show) takes far far longer to do.


#12

Fair enough. I certainly agree it’s best practice to separate data from software but have become a little bit more relaxed about exactly where on the system drive software is installed since I don’t use that disk at all for data except in very short term situations.

I’m one for keeping all data on a server where backups can be handled automatically and there’s less worry about a catastrophic failure - if a local machine fails, another can quickly take its place. I don’t, however, practice this with Manager where I found a small glitch in the network connection could cause problems (that’ll be where the server version will come in handy I’m sure and is on my radar at some point soon).

Anyway, this is all by-the-by chit-chat and not really related to your topic. Glad you’ve got a solution.


#13

I can’t put my data on a server. My home computer is used for work - I don’t have a work place - I work on site at clients.

Don’t worry, all my data is backed up to the Internet in the event of a catastrophe.