Invoicing a customer

If i invoice a customer will it automatically debit the customer account - i need an invoice for presentation but on acceptance only post to the account.A quote does not meet this requirement for the customer.
There is logic behind the question
Thank you
Gerard

Yes, it will automatically debit the customer’s subaccount in Accounts receivable. What you describe might be called a pro forma invoice. Use a sales quote, but give it a different title. Read the Guide: https://www.manager.io/guides/7238.

Understand that an invoice is a legally binding demand for payment that takes into account all circumstances of the sale or contract. A quote (or whatever you call it) is about prospective transactions. Once the quote is accepted, copy it to a sales invoice: https://www.manager.io/guides/7262.

I understand the legalities of an invoice but my customer wants an invoice first then if accepted he will confirm.The question is from a system process - if i create a invoice will it automatically debit the customer or can i process the transaction manually later

I don’t understand - you send your customer an invoice. If he agrees , it is confirmed. If he doesn’t you send him a different invoice, and so on until he confirms the invoice?

Surely, this negotiation takes place before you provide the service or goods and not after?

Your question was already answered in my first response.

Then let me rephrase it - if i invoice a customer will it be automatically be debited to the customer account or can i manually process it later.
I am asking about the system process not reasons or issues
And despite the mails stating it was answered in the first response - it was not!

In some jurisdictions you can issue the proforma to ask the payment and the invoice only when you receive the payment. This will save you from anticipating VAT if the customer delays the payment since in most of the cases is on accrual basis and not on cash basis.

@gerard, for the third time, if you enter a sales invoice, the customer’s subaccount under Accounts receivable will be automatically debited. There is no possibility of manually processing the invoice later. If you enter it, it will be posted. So, if you don’t want it to post, you cannot issue a sales invoice.

It most assuredly was, in the very first word of the first response. You asked:

I answered:

Issuing a sales invoice will also automatically credit whatever income account(s) you have chosen for the line item(s). The only variability in the process comes if you change from accrual to cash basis accounting, but that only affects timing of when the income is recognized. The customer’s account is still debited automatically by the sales invoice. The Accounts receivable account will be suppressed in the Summary display under cash basis accounting, but customer’s account will still have been debited.

In Manager this is done by

Which will result in a document you can show to your customer titled “Invoice”
When the “Invoice” is accepted you can then copy it to a Manager invoice when the accounting transaction will occur

If done in Manager using the invoice facility

I assume it is being used to make an ambit claim or as a tool during contract negotiations or debit recovery.

But I agree, in most countries producing documents stating you have legal entitlement to payment when you do not believe you do / are willing to document in your accounts/ be liable for subsequent costs is pushing the legal boundaries

You said,
“I understand the legalities of an invoice but my customer wants an invoice first”

What your customer wants/needs is a quote, not a sales invoice. Use a quote document and change its name in the Custom title.check box. Call it “Pro Forma Invoice”, “Quotation/Estimate”, “Goods & Services Proposal” or whatever you want to or think is appropriate.

You said,
“then if accepted he will confirm.”

If your customer accepts the quote (or whatever it’s named), you then view it, and click [Copy to] “New sales invoice”.
Then, and ONLY THEN does the content get added to your customer’s billable account.

Cheers,
Harry

thanks a solution - simple and easy and does the job